Tim Samaras, Paul Samaras, Carl Young killed chasing Tornado

Archived topics from the General Weather Discussion board.
Locked
User avatar
mick
Supercell
Posts: 1445
Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2009 6:45 pm
Location: Mid North SA Baaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

Mon Jun 03, 2013 10:24 am

Many of you would be aware of Tim and his work studying Tornadoes and Thunderstorms, he invented the "Pods" that he placed in the path of Tornadoes to collect data. You would have also seen his live streaming and videos over the years and of course the Storm Chasers TV show on Discovery. RIP and thanks for everything.

Three veteran storm chasers were among the 10 people killed following Friday's EF3 tornado in El Reno, Okla.

Renowned researcher and storm chaser Tim Samaras, 55, his son Paul Samaras, 24, and his chase partner Carl Young, 45, passed away after they were overtaken by the multiple-vortex tornado, which appeared to be in the midst of a sharp change in direction.
The Storm Prediction Center issued a statement Sunday, saying it was terribly saddened by Tim Samaras' death.

"Samaras was a respected tornado researcher and friend ... who brought to the field a unique portfolio of expertise in engineering, science, writing and videography," the center's statement said.


Tim Samaras sits with instrument probes he used as part of his TWISTEX field research program. Samaras holds the Guinness World Record for the largest measured pressure drop inside a tornado.

Tim Samaras, a native of Lakewood, Colo., holds the Guinness World Record for the greatest pressure drop ever measured inside a tornado. He designed, built, and deployed instrument probes to measure atmospheric variables such as pressure and wind in the path of tornadoes.

He deployed one of these in the path of an F4 tornado that destroyed the small town of Manchester, S.D., on June 24, 2003. This probe registered a world-record 100-millibar drop in pressure inside the twister.

amaras, a tornado scientist for over 25 years, founded and ran a scientific field research program dubbed TWISTEX (Tactical Weather Instrumented Sampling in Tornadoes EXperiment). He also starred in the Discovery Channel series Storm Chasers.

The Weather Channel's severe weather expert, Dr. Greg Forbes, knew Tim personally. "He was a groundbreaker in terms of the kind of research he was doing on severe thunderstorms and tornadoes," Dr. Forbes said on The Weather Channel Sunday morning.
Jim Cantore, a Weather Channel meteorologist, tweeted Sunday that meteorologists were in mourning.

"This is a very sad day for the meteorological community and the families of our friends lost. Tim Samaras was a pioneer and great man," he wrote.

"He looked at tornadoes not for the spotlight of TV but for the scientific aspect. At the end of the day, he wanted to save lives and he gave the ultimate sacrifice for that," Jim Samaras said. In tribute to his brother, Jim Samaras posted on Facebook:

Thank you to everyone for the condolences. It truly is sad that we lost my great brother Tim and his great son, Paul. Our hearts also go out to the Carl Young family as well as they are feeling the same feelings we are today. They all unfortunately passed away but doing what they LOVED. Chasing Tornado's. [sic] I look at it that he is in the 'big tornado in the sky...'
Jim Samaras said his brother, nephew and their colleague were dedicated to avoiding trouble while chasing storms, and that the family wasn't worried about whether he was taking care of himself.

"I don't know if I would say I worried about it because one of the biggest things he stressed was safety. He knew what to look for. He knew where not to be and in this case the tornado took a clear turn toward them," he said.

Video taken by a number of storm chasers showed debris pelting vehicles Friday. Winds swept one vehicle with a crew from The Weather Channel off the road, tossed it 200 yards and flipped it into a field -- they escaped major injury.

Carl Young, a California native, joined Samaras in the field in 2003. He earned his Master of Science degree in atmospheric science from the University of Nevada. According to his Discovery Channel biography, Young and Samaras tracked down over 125 tornadoes together.

The men worked as a team and Tim Samaras had received 18 grants from the National Geographic Society for work in the field.

"Tim was a courageous and brilliant scientist who fearlessly pursued tornadoes and lightning in the field in an effort to better understand these phenomena," the society said on its website. "Though we sometimes take it for granted, Tim's death is a stark reminder of the risks encountered regularly by the men and women who work for us."

In Canadian County, Okla., where the men died, Undersheriff Chris West noted the three were hoping to help understand violent storms.

"They put themselves in harm's way so that they can educate the public about the destructive power of these storms," he said.

The Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla., said it believed the deaths were the first time scientific researchers were killed while chasing tornadoes. The Samaras' and Young were pursuing an EF3 tornado as it bore down on a metropolitan area of more than 1 million people. In 2012, storm chaser Andy Gabrielson died while driving home from a chase when a wrong-way driver struck his vehicle on Interstate 44 in Sapulpa, Okla.

The Storm Prediction Center said scientific storm chasing is performed as safely as possible, with trained researchers using appropriate technology. It encouraged all, including the media and amateurs, to chase safely to avoid a repeat of Friday's deaths.
User avatar
Rivergirl
Admin/Moderator
Posts: 3669
Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2009 6:04 pm
Location: Ferny Creek VIC
Contact:

Mon Jun 03, 2013 10:53 am

Yes that was just shocking news. I didn't know whether to post or not yesterday as at the time I found out the family were trying to keep the names out of the media but it's everywhere now. I loved Storm Chasers so am saddened by this loss and the other souls who lost their lives. RIP
User avatar
mick
Supercell
Posts: 1445
Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2009 6:45 pm
Location: Mid North SA Baaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

Tue Jun 04, 2013 6:26 pm

They were streaming live on Saturday morning. I was watching for a few hours, they were approaching a core after making a ubolt then they stopped streaming, the pic froze, nothing out of the ordinary in the video and didnt come back so I logged off because it was getting too dark over there to see much because of the cloud, there was still daylight left but it was like night.

I couldnt believe it when I heard the news, I still cant believe it. 990 people were watching that stream when it stopped.
User avatar
Rivergirl
Admin/Moderator
Posts: 3669
Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2009 6:04 pm
Location: Ferny Creek VIC
Contact:

Wed Jun 05, 2013 10:38 am

That would have been terrible. I was watching the F1 when Senna crashed and died. It's an eerie feeling, tragic.
User avatar
Karl Lijnders
Tornadic Supercell
Posts: 5771
Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2009 11:17 pm
Location: Knoxfield, Victoria

Thu Jun 06, 2013 7:14 am

They have upgraded the tornado in that region to an EF5.

http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMa ... rynum=2426" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Former Owner - The Australian Weather Forum. Email me anytime - weatherman1000@hotmail.com
User avatar
mick
Supercell
Posts: 1445
Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2009 6:45 pm
Location: Mid North SA Baaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

Tue Jun 11, 2013 5:18 pm

I thought they might. There is a video of a Back Hawk surveillance flight, block after block is totally gone. What amazes me is that the debris has been scattered to all points of the compass, it was falling 60 miles ahead of the tornado and in large pieces. Just terrible.
Locked